Busy

Our jobs are important but they’re not essentials.

I’ve been having to remind myself that while working furiously (by this, I mean intensely & with all my heart) is great — I shouldn’t let my 9 to 5 steal occupy more space in my life than it should. It’s been happening in the last 3 months — work took a seat a my dinner table, I showered with it, I dreamed it, I asked my spouse about it. It edged essential things out.

I let my “today” items (the deadlines, the emails & calls to return, the targets to meet) overtake things I desperately needed for more “tomorrows” (self-care, prayer, time with family, sleep).

Tomorrow is Monday. I think it’s time I put today down.

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Pinay & Proud: inspiring young millennials to go beyond ‘snap-worthy’ adventures

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Go beyond ‘snap-worthy’ experiences & doing things for the ‘gram. You were made to shine: this the what we’d like to impart to the young audience of the upcoming Pinay & Proud Summit.  

Ten exemplary women will be featured at Human Nature’s 1st Pinay & Proud Summit. Pinay & Proud is part of Human Nature’s longstanding campaign to highlight the lifework of Filipino women from all walks of life, Pinay & Proud honors the unique and exceptional values of the Filipina: nurturing, courageous, kind, and beautiful.

Themed “Your Goodness Shines”, the summit will be held at Benilde’s School of Design and Arts Theater on October 19. Part of Human Nature’s longstanding campaign to highlight the lifework of Filipino women from all walks of life, Pinay & Proud honors the unique and exceptional values of the Filipina: nurturing, courageous, kind, and beautiful.  

 

The campaign’s youth focus comes at opportune time. In a report published by the National Youth Commission in 2015, half of our country’s population will be under 25 years old. The report adds that “passion, experience, adventure and meaning are just some words that define today’s millennial.”

 

“We brought back Pinay & Proud because we felt that many of our youth are looking for role models. Our honorees are not just an inspiration because of their personal achievements in life, but because of their commitment to serve others,” explained Human Nature Co-Founder and President Anna Meloto-Wilk.

  Continue reading “Pinay & Proud: inspiring young millennials to go beyond ‘snap-worthy’ adventures”

The Essential Invisibles

Who hasn’t worked with someone they disliked? I’m sure, many of us have worked with people who made us uncomfortable or whose values completely clashed with ours.

Sitting across difficult clients or hotheaded superiors can be psychologically taxing — especially if you’re a PR pro. It can be hard for people to distinguish between personable & pushover —  doubly so when  you make it a point to give your critical feedback in a calm, pleasant way!

At times, the road of least resistance can be far, far more appealing. Upholding what is moral and ethical while your boss fumes in the boardroom? Forget it.

After all, there’s only so much feedback you can give — and besides, if he doesn’t want to listen (to advice he paid for!) — it’s his funeral, right?

Wrong.

It’s easy to grin and bear it. It’s easy to let a difficult client continue a foolhardy strategy. It’s easy but it’s not right.

As communications professionals serving the public through our work with media, we have to accept that we’re not doing anyone favors if we take the easy road. It’s a disservice even to ourselves.

My remedy for such situations is simple:

  1. Treat it like a classic communications challenge. Dispense your advice 3 different ways: appeal to logic & facts, appeal to emotion, and most of all — highlight why it is advantageous for the client to follow your advice.
  2. Let them decide and take a step back. One of two things will happen. Either client will see your way and follow your suggested course of action or she won’t! (Sometimes,  I like taking a walk after I’ve expended all my energy in convincing my boss to follow a certain course of action. Mind you, I don’t walk out. I just take a walk after the meeting has adjourned…)
  3. Respect their position. Try your hardest to realign your course of action with your superior’s chosen strategy. Forget your misgivings & hope that they are right. And if it turns out that they are not, forgive them.

“What rubbish,” you might tell yourself after going through the trouble of reading through my 3-point remedy. And that is OK.

You see, doing what is right isn’t about being right. It’s not about oneupmanship. 

Save yourself from the psychological stress of seeing your well-laid plans fall apart. Salvage your relationship with your work colleagues. Hold fast to the essential ‘invisibles’: integrity, ethics, and forgiveness.

Happy weekend!

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Does your job make you cry?

Today, I’m celebrating my 7th year in public relations. Sometimes I can’t believe I stayed so long in an industry I never meant to work in! 🙂

Some things I’ve learned:

That thing people say that about business not being personal isn’t true. An organization is only as good as the people running it. If your job doesn’t drive you to tears at one point, if you don’t have a sleepless night or two out of sheer excitement for your work ahead, if you’ve never fought hard for a project, if an idea has never made your heart race — you probably haven’t found  your sweet spot.

It’s OK to be emotional. I’ll take emotional over fake any day.

If you’re panicking and overwhelmed, make a list. Instead of diving head first and becoming busy doing tasks that may not contribute to long-term success, take some time to sort the things you need to do. Ask yourself: if there was one thing I needed to accomplish within the first half of my work day — what would it be? What could alter the course of the next few months?

Long Monday morning planning meetings rarely accomplish anything. Enough.  

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And yes, my job makes me cry.

It has made me immensely happy, it made me throw mugs, it has made me excitedly bolt out of bed at 5AM — in short, it is my sweet spot. 😀